As a phlegmatic, it is natural for one to find satisfaction in spending time alone or sometimes only reaching out to 1 or 2 people to have a conversation with. However, ASEAN-AFOCO workshop truly opens my eyes on the important of making connections with people, especially with those who live in ASEAN countries. It seems like, there are similarities among us who live in Southeast Asia, yet we came from different nations. These similarities that we felt upon each other are the key to the bonds that were made between ASEAN countries.  I am truly glad to have met some new good friends, both from ASEAN countries and South Korea.

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During the first 3 days in Supchewon, everyone got to know each other and enjoying the nature. Whilst enjoying the nature, we got to learn lots of thing about forestry and the initiative movement by the Korean government to build forests throughout Korea.  We were also got the chance to learn deeply about others’ culture through many fun activities throughout the whole program in Supchewon, South Korea.

One of the participants, Anggara Raharyo,delivered his “thank you” speech during the closing ceremony of the Workshop in South Korea.

One of the participants, Anggara Raharyo,delivered his “thank you” speech during the closing ceremony of the Workshop in South Korea.

The 3-days workshop in Supchewon was really informative and we learnt a lot about forestry and we are ready to bring some change upon the field of forestry towards our country. As for the Outbound participants. We still have 5-days workshop to attend in Indonesia.  In Jakarta, Indonesia, we visited the ASEAN secretariat and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry of Indonesia. During our visit to the Ministry of Environment and Forestry of Indonesia, lots of questions were asked by the participants regarding issues of forestry around ASEAN countries and South Korea. Indonesia is unquestionably one of the world’s top biodiversity rich countries and thus a priority for global conservation, and we were told that lots of preservation and conservation movement were made by Indonesia government throughout the years, in order to protect its biodiversity. Yet, the deforestation rate of Indonesia is still high due to the unchanging energy source and illegal logging.

Participants diligently engaged in a lecture by Prof. Dr.Mohammad Na’iem)

Participants diligently engaged in a lecture by Prof. Dr.Mohammad Na’iem)

Participants and lecturers in the “Forest and Health” seminar

Participants and lecturers in the “Forest and Health” seminar

We were also got the chance to visit some beautiful landmarks around Jogjakarta, such as Borobudur temple and Prambanan temple.

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Some of the things that I learned during the trip was Prambanan was originally mean as Para Brahman. Para means a group of people while Brahman was the priest and teachers who attained the highest spiritual knowledge. The temple was once occupied and in control of the Brahmins’ in that area, until the place was evacuated due to the volcanic eruption of Gunung Merapi.

Prambanan Temple

Prambanan Temple

Malaysian and South Korean participants taking a photo together around Prambanan temple

Malaysian and South Korean participants taking a photo together around Prambanan temple

Participants taking a photo in front of the peak of Borobudur temple

Participants taking a photo in front of the peak of Borobudur temple

Personally, I think our visit to Prambanan temple and Borobudur temple was one of the highlights of our trip to Indonesia.  Both temples were stunning. No wonder these temples were to be in the list of UNESCO world heritages. To be concluded, our days in Supchewon, South Korea and in Indonesia were as amazing as we expected. We learn a lot about forestry and its importance while having the chance to know some new awesome friends during the workshop.

 

Kelvin Ining, ASEAN-Korea Youth Network Workshop 2015 participant

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